The long tragedy of Cham history

671444957

Cham people photographed during the period of the French Protectorate . The traditional warfare pattern in South East Asia generally aimed at conquering and dominating sparse populations

 

The Khmer empire, from the ninth to the 15th century, obviously didn’t develop in isolation. But, looking at the map of Southeast Asia from a historical point of view, it’s nevertheless clear  that this political construction benefited from an unprecedented geopolitical quietness, at least until the 13th century.

The Vietnamese hadn’t even begun their march to the south, and the Thai state was  made up of embryonic chieftainships.

Yet the exception that proved the rule occurred. In the year 1177, guided by a Chinese deserter, the Cham fleet sailed the Mekong river upstream and from Phnom Penh, the Tonle Sap. They took Angkor by urprise, plundering and destroying the town. Continue reading

Selected Groups in the Republic of Vietnam: The Cham

COUNTERINSURGENCY INFORMATION ANALYSIS CENTER SPECIAL OPERATIONS RESEARCH OFFICE

1432150178811This working paper on the Cham is the third of a pre-publication series on the groups being distributed on a limited basis. It is a descriptive report based on secondary sources dealing with the Vietnamese society. Field research was not undertaken, although the comments of consultants and personnel recently returned from Vietnam have been incorporated. The final report will contain line drawings and illustrations.

It must be recognized, then, that this paper on the Cham is not an exhaustive study. Further, the information contained herein may be dated even before it is published and may be subject to modification in the light of new developments and information. Although it contains the latest information available, the user is cautioned to consider this study as a point of departure to be checked against the current circumstances or conditions of the particular area in which he is working. Continue reading

Indo-China and its primitive people

Baudesson, Henryindo-china-primitive-people-01

A lively report published by Captain Henry Baudesson in 1932 upon returning from years of work in the interior of Vietnam on various French colonial public works. The author lived for years among the Moïs, which means “savages” in Vietnamese, and comprises several hill tribes. He also spent a considerable period of time with the Cham, the curious remnants of the great Mohammedan Champa state. The book is lavishly illustrated with period photographs of these hill people and their customs in which captain Baudesson took a special interest. Their social life and religious rites are placed in the wider context of studies of primitive peoples in other parts of the world. His descriptions of their art and culture are charac-terized by great respect for those who would soon suffer so much from the growing influence of colonial ventures brought by way of the railway line on which he was himself working. Continue reading

Chiêm Thành lược khảo

3Chiêm Thành lược khảo xuất bản năm 1936 với lời đề Tựa của chủ bút Tạp chí Nam Phong Phạm Quỳnh là cuốn sách đầu tiên bằng quốc ngữ viết về dân tộc và đất nước Champa.

Continue reading