Adjuncts to Empire: The EFEO and the Conservation of Champa Antiquities

Image result for Chapman UH ManoaWilliam Chapman

Abstract

This paper examines the pivotal role of the École française d’Extrême-Oriente in the excavation, delineation, and interpretation of Champa sites in Vietnam. It further suggests the significance of this work in laying the groundwork for further archaeological efforts by the EFEO in Cambodia, Laos, and Northeast Thailand. The paper examines in detail the range of Champa sites, their relation to French scholarship of the early 20th century and their importance as training for later interventions.

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Islam in Champa and the Making of Factitious History

STEPHEN G. HAW

Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society

Series 3, page 1 of 31

Image result for STEPHEN G. HAWAbstract

Since their first publication in 1922, two Islamic inscriptions formed an essential basis of the early history of Islam in Champa. Recently, however, they have been shown to have originated, not from Southeast Asia, but from Tunisia. It is clear that either there was an error regarding their provenance, or it was deliberately falsified. The implications of this are discussed, and the remaining evidence of early Islamic presence in Champa is reassessed. It is suggested that there is now no good evidence of any Islamic presence there until after the sixteenth century. In relation to this issue, the maritime links between China and the Islamic world are examined, as also are other examples of possible falsification of history.

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