[CALL FOR PAPERS] Performing Arts and the Royal Courts of Southeast Asia

CALL FOR PAPERS
Performing Arts and the Royal Courts of Southeast Asia
12-13 July 2018
Sunway University, Malaysia
This symposium brings together current scholarship on past and present roles of Southeast Asia’s
royal courts in regional performing arts.
Royal courts have long been sites for the creation, exchange, maintenance, and development of
myriad forms of performing arts, literature, and other distinctive cultural expressions.
Performing arts have been included among royal regalia of numerous kingdoms. They have
figured prominently in traditional displays of dominion. In many cases, they were transferred
between courts through marriage, conquest, diplomatic exchanges, trade, and tributary relations.
Within the kingdoms themselves, the performing arts have circulated between royal courts and the
public, providing vibrant mediums for civic discourse, education, and articulations of spirituality
and shared identity. Today, many of them occupy iconic positions within the popular imagination
as national heritage and classical archetypes.
As such, their legacies have important stories to tell about the region’s history, as well as the roles,
protocols, functions, and perceptions of monarchies in the present. This symposium addresses
three distinct, but related areas of discussion:
Inter-court relations:
● How have court-to-court relations shaped the development of Southeast Asia’s performing arts?
● What do the performing arts tell us about power relations between past polities?
Intra-kingdom circulations:
● How have palace-village exchanges contributed to developments, refinements, and standardized
practices in the performing arts?
● How do the performing arts reflect the institutions, ideologies, and constitutions of power
produced under state sponsorship?
Contemporary implications:
● What roles do courts or court legacies play in the production and development of performing arts
in the twenty-first century?
● How have performing arts figured in the transformations of Southeast Asia’s hereditary polities
into modern states?
● How have recent generations of royal-court descendants transformed their patronage of the arts as
politicians, activists and entrepreneurs?
Abstract and Publication Details

Submission deadline: 15 January 2018
Abstract length: 250 words, along with a short biographical note (100 words or less)
Send to: PARC.SEA@gmail.com
—Please allow one month for notification from the program committee
We call for abstracts from scholars in Southeast Asian performing arts with fresh perspectives
germane to the abovementioned areas, who might draw from a range of topics including, but not
limited to, issues of origin and myth, genealogy, stylistic developments, repertoires and genres,
tools and instruments, ritual practices, proscriptions, and cultural preservation. We especially
welcome a variety of methodological approaches from a broad array of disciplines such as
heritage and history studies, manuscript studies, comparative studies, gender studies, religious
studies, ethnography, oral history, or hermeneutical studies.
Symposium papers should be 20 minutes in length. Additional time will be allotted for discussion.
Participants will be expected to contribute an expanded version of their symposium presentation
(of at least 8,000 words) as a chapter within a published anthology to be co-edited by the
conveners. The first draft of the publication manuscript will be due within three months of the
symposium.
Local Arrangements
The committee will provide all selected speakers with airport transfer (between Kuala Lumpur
International Airport and the symposium site/hotel), and cover accommodation, symposium fees,
and meals for the duration of the symposium.
We thank you for considering your participation in this symposium. Please address any questions
regarding the event to the abovementioned email address.
The Conveners
Lawrence N. Ross, Academy of Malay Studies, University of Malaya (lawrence.apm@gmail.com)
Mayco Santaella, Department of Performance & Media, Sunway University
(santaellamayco@gmail.com)

 

Weaving Life Across Borders: The Cham Muslim Migrants Traversing Vietnam and Malaysia

Angie Ngoc TranImage result for Angie Ngoc Tran California State University, Monterey Bay

California State University, Monterey Bay, USA
e-mail: atran@csumb.edu
Abstract

Focusing on the understudied Cham (Sunni) Muslims who live in the Mekong Delta region of southern Vietnam, decades after Vietnam joined the market system, I found that they have sustained their century-old mobile ways of life—including retailing, fishing, and sewing—in close connection with the global Islamic community to make a living and to continue their religious studies. But a mixed picture emerges in their response to Vietnam’s labor export policy since 2002: practicing geographical agency with short-term successes but facing more risks as both men and women engage in extra local journeys, crossing borders into Cambodia, Thailand, and Malaysia. Continue reading

Weaving Life Across Borders: The Cham Muslim Migrants Traversing Vietnam and Malaysia

Angie Ngoc Tran

Abstract

Focusing on the understudied Cham (Sunni) Muslims who live in the Mekong Delta region of southern Vietnam, decades after Vietnam joined the market system, I found that they have sustained their century-old mobile ways of life— including retailing, fishing, and sewing—in close connection with the global Islamic community to make a living and to continue their religious studies. But a mixed picture emerges in their response to Vietnam’s labor export policy since 2002: practicing geographical agency with short-term successes but facing more risks as both men and women engage in extra local journeys, crossing borders into Cambodia, Thailand, and Malaysia. Continue reading

Hợp tác quốc tế về chương trình nghiên cứu ấn triện Champa

an trien tdChampa là vương quốc có nền văn tự lâu đời. Bia Võ Cạnh (Nha Trang) viết bằng chữ Chăm cổ vào thế kỷ thứ II là thí dụ điển hình. Bên cạnh những văn bản khắc trên văn bia, những tác phẩm văn học bằng Akhar Thrah truyền thống, vương quốc Champa còn để lại cho hậu thế một kho tàng tư liệu hoàng gia được phát hiện vào năm 1902 hiện đang lưu trử tại thư viện của Société Asiatique de Paris.

Tài liệu hoàng gia Champa tập trung 5227 trang trong đó có 4402 trang viết bằng Akhar Thrah Chăm và 825 trang bằng tiếng Hán và Nôm mà Ts. Po Dharma đang nghiên cứu và chuyển ngữ sang tiếng La Tinh từ mấy năm qua. Đây là tư liệu chính thức của vương quốc Champa dưới thời đô hộ của nhà Nguyễn kể kể từ năm 1692, được chứng thực bởi 405 ấn triện khắc bằng chữ Hán do nhà Nguyễn ban cho và 2 ấn triện bằng Akhar Rik. Continue reading

The Raja Praong Ritual: A Memory of the Sea in Cham- Malay Relations

Sakaya

(Extracted from Truong Van Mon, “The Raja Praong Ritual: a Memory of the sea in Cham- Malay Relations”, in Memory And Knowledge Of The Sea In South Asia, Institute of Ocean and Earth Sciences, University of Malaya, Monograph Sries 3, pp, 97-111. International Seminar on Martime Culture and Geopolitics & Workshop on Bajau Laut Music and Dance”, Institute of Ocean and Earth Sciences and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, University of Malaya, 23-24/2008)

Abstract

Raja Praong ritual of the Chams in Vietnam contains memory of ships and seas which have historically related between the Chams and Malays. Besides hymns describe on Champa wooden ships crossing sea to Malay, two wooden ships of Malay are also reproduced to perform in the Raja Praong ritual today. By Cham manuscripts with an historical point of view, the main content of the study focuses theme by many aspects such as legend, hymn, master, sea route, origin, shape and structure of wooden ships, specially the two Malay ships in order to find out memory and knowledge of the ships and seas as well as historical relations between Champa and Malay during 17th –19th centuries.

Key Words: Champa-Malay, sea, ship, relation, history Continue reading